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Urban Studies Blog Series

Centre for Urban Studies

Results: 61 - 66 of 66
Results: 61 - 66 of 66
  • Canal in Amsterdam
    The World’s Most Liberal City - By Prof. Jan Willem Duyvendak

    There are many Amsterdams. The city has a different meaning for each inhabitant and every visitor. The city’s slogan I Amsterdam seems to acknowledge this individualized experience (it is not ‘We Amsterdam’). In his blog, Erik Swyngedouw invites us to share his particular view on Amsterdam, when he asks: “I wonder where my Amsterdam is?”, followed by a deeply nostalgic view on his Amsterdam that has disappeared: “Thirty odd years later, and after many returns to my beloved Amsterdam, I feel increasingly alienated by the city, a whiff of nostalgia to a lost dream and a melancholic dread permeates my body and mind when drifting along Amsterdam’s streets and canals. Sure, it still is a great city, a global cosmopolitan urbanity that feels like a village. The quirky sites and unexpected corners are still there, but the city’s soul, its mojo seems to have decamped.”

  • Political Science
    Goodbye, city district councils. You will be missed for at least one unexpected reason - By associate professor Floris Vermeulen

    Thirty years ago Amsterdam installed its first city districts. At the highpoint of this era, in 2002, there were 14 city districts (stadsdelen). Each had its own council (stadsdeelraad). And each thus provided a place where Amsterdam politics, with all its ups and downs, became truly local. It might seem strange to an outsider or, for that matter, to an insider to have so many small ‘parliaments’ in a city with less than 800,000 inhabitants. But this won’t be an issue next year.

  • Amsterdam canal with bikes
    Where is Amsterdam? - By visiting Prof. Erik Swyngedouw

    Amsterdam takes a very special and privileged position in my intellectual trajectory. As a young and radical planning student in Belgium in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the stale, dogmatic, antiquated and plainly stifling intellectual and cultural environment that characterized much of academic and urban life in my native Belgium at the time contrasted sharply with the exuberantly liberating, exhilarating and radical thought and associated urban practices that came in as a whirlwind from the Netherlands and, in particular, from Amsterdam.

  • Amsterdam, Leidseplein, Theatre
    Choose or Loose? - By Prof. Maarten Hajer

    It was in the mid 1990s. On our way to a family holiday in the Alps we made a stopover in Salzburg. Salzburg, the city of Mozart, of the fortress and, of course, The Sound of Music. Parking signs guided us to a parking house, which happened to be built in a massive rock, right near the city centre. We entered with the car on one side and left as pedestrians on the other. At once the whole environment had changed. It was like a jump in time. The old Burgerstadt of Salzburg was stripped of all modern artifacts. In its place caleches, young men with wigs and in livery, violin music. In fact the city was readied for touristic consumption to the max, and the flocks of visitors clearly liked it. It made me exclaim: Salzburg is Europe’s answer to Disneyland.

  • Canal in Amsterdam
    The Resilience of the Amsterdam Canal Belt - By Prof. Robert Kloosterman & Prof. Ewald Engelen

    The façade of the houses along the Amsterdam canals seems to have changed little in four centuries. Behind the doors, however, things are quite different. It is not just that the interiors are very different, but, even more important, significant shifts in the economic activities have taken place.

  • Student Jasmin Thielen
    Starting in Amsterdam - By Cody Hochstenbach and Dr. Willem Boterman

    Amsterdam has significantly increased in popularity during the last decade: most of the inner city neighbourhoods are experiencing gentrification and the population has grown steadily – in 2012 the milestone of 800,000 inhabitants was passed. This success relates to the city’s function as an ‘escalator’: many young people move to the city to study or find work. At a later point in time, they might move out. Partly because housing construction has not kept up with population growth and growing housing market pressures this function is threatened.